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BREAKING: After Racial Violence In Charlottesville, Major City EXPEDITING Confederate Statue Removal

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The left seems to think that erasing our history somehow fixes it. It doesn’t, but they keep trying to erase it anyway.

Take Charlottesville, for example. The rallies held there over the weekend were in protest of the removal of a statue of Confederate General Robert E. Lee, who was against segregation and secession, but you’d never know it by listening to the media’s coverage because they’re trying to say it was a bunch of eeeeeevvvviiiil racists!

In the aftermath of the event, a mayor in Kentucky has announced that his city will be expediting the scrubbing of American history, a part of which honors a former vice president who just happened to serve as the Confederate secretary of war.

Yes, that’s how bad this is getting.

Why?

Because, feelings!

From the New York Times [emphasis added]

Hours after a protest organized by white nationalists against the removal of a Confederate monument erupted into violence and chaos in Charlottesville, Va., the mayor of Lexington, Ky., said he would speed up plans to relocate similar statues from the city’s former courthouse.

The mayor, Jim Gray, said in a statement that plans to move the statues were planned before the violence in Charlottesville, which killed a 32-year-old woman and injured at least 34 others. He said what happened there “accelerated the announcement I intended to make next week.”

“We have thoroughly examined this issue, and heard from many of our citizens,” he said in the statement posted on Saturday.

The statues of John Hunt Morgan, a Confederate general, and John C. Breckinridge, the 14th vice president of the United States who also served as the Confederate secretary of war, are on the grounds of Lexington’s former courthouse.

Again, removing our history from the public square doesn’t change our history. This is a dangerous path to go down, and will undoubtedly lead to removing anything from our past that people even remotely find uncomfortable.

That’s not what this country is supposed to be about.

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